How much do hearing aids cost?

The cost of a hearing aid is tied to it’s advanced features. Typically, the more feature rich a hearing aid, the more expensive it is. Your need for features is directly tied to the complexity of listening environments you find yourself in (meetings, talking on the phone, watching TV…). With greater situational need comes greater technological need. What pricing should I expect for hearing aids? The actual range is quite wide, from $500 for a single basic hearing aid to $7,500 for a set of advanced digital hearing aids. So yes, hearing aids can be expensive! Do I need more than a hearing aid? Hearing aids aren’t always the only consideration when it comes to hearing help. A range of other assistive listening devices (ALDs) exist, providing benefit to both hearing aid users and non-hearing aid users. In general, ALDs exist to make up for the short comings of hearing aids (i.e. noisy situations, distance situations, and poor acoustics). What is pricing for an Assisted Listening Device? Like hearing aids the cost range for ALDs similarly has a wide continuum. This cost range is based directly upon the intricacy of listening environments. The more complex the environment (i.e. high noise, long distance, and poor acoustic environments) the more advanced the ALD, and therefore greater price. The ALD genre includes everything from a basic personal amplification device (helps in face to face conversation in quiet) all the way up to advanced adaptive wireless technology (parties and restaurant interaction). Given this, the realistic price range for ALDS spans from $150 up to $2,000. So, how can you justify a purchasing an...

How can I justify using an FM?

Let’s be honest… sometimes hearing aids don’t measure up! If you have a hearing loss and have already been fit with a hearing aid,  you know hearing can still be difficult at times. Naturally, you might be asking yourself:     To answer this question you must define the situations a hearing aid can solve. A hearing aid is extremely effective in the near field. This means if a listening situation is occurring with about 5-8 ft of you, a hearing aid can handle most every demand. Most issues with hearing aids arise outside of this near field bubble. Life doesn’t happen in a neat 5-8 ft circle! Most listening situations are dynamic and happen in all types of noise and at varying distances. For these dynamic situations (far field situations) an assistive listening device (ALD), specifically an FM system is justifiable. FMs allow for a microphone to be placed at the sound source to pick up the sound of interest. Sound can then be wirelessly relayed to your hearing aids. An FM can therefore effectively overcome the effects that distance, noise and room acoustics have on a sound. Quick Facts: **Where hearing aids fall short is where an FM shines: 1. In background noise a hearing aid directional microphone can  increase signal to noise ratio 3-5 dB. An FM system can boost the SNR at the hearing impaired individuals ear by 15-25 dB. 2. At a distance: with each doubling of distance, sound arrives at a hearing aid 6 dB SPL softer. An FM places a microphone at the sound source. Therefore sound arrives at your ear at...